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and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
environment, we are warriors as opposed to common criminals who should be should be investigated and based on that investigation prosecuted to the fullest extent of the law? many people have made grandiose claims about wanting to be in a war. how that ends up getting decided is based on facts on the ground. it is based on law and facts not on suppositions or on the grandiose claims of people who would like to be bigger than they are. >> host: him ma shamsi with the aclu, american civil libertis. and cliff may, foundation for defense of democracies. he writes a weekly column distributed by scripps howard news service and contributes to nationalreview.online, townhall.com among other publications a lot of folks want to talk to you. let's get back to the lines. charles, wood bridge, virginia, republican, go ahead. >> caller: thanks. you know i am a republican and i am an american obviously and i, my stance is that, i believe -- [inaudible] >> host: charles, we're losing you right as we get. >> caller: i'm sorry. >> host: say it again? >> caller: thank you, i'm sorry. i believe that the admini
but not faulty aggression. he has to be able to work in different environments and have the drive. >> they look like german shepherds but they're not, correct? >> correct. this is a belgian. they're very similar. dutch shepherd german shepherd and this one. >> i remember the raids carried out on osama bin laden's compound that we learned about a mall inroy. his name was cairo, is that correct? >> that's correct. >> that's the first time i got the sense that wow, these are dogs with elite units. >> absolutely it's something that has. been -- >> what do they do? why is it so critical to have a dog? >> the primary thing for them is bomb detection. to have the ability for a dog to be able to move out in front is priceless. >> and i kept -- when did this start happening? did somebody say let's bring a dog and somebody said that's not a good idea or did somebody say, that is a good idea? >> dogs have been used since man existed but special operations started using them in vietnam and then after that the programs were largely disbanded and after 9/11 it was decided s
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
audiences. but in the modern media environment people target small nations and how do i get young males or the latest women or black people? and some have decided to use prejudice, stereotypes to draw the audience to keep them on that platform. so what i try to do is explore that a little bit and describe what that is happening to help people diffuse these things so they can recognize and they see it on fox news, a msnbc or the drug report they have a sense of what is going on and they're made more media at aliterate and can respond in a way that made sense for growth. you made the term coded language? >> one of the great successes of the civil-rights movement be reached a point* where our racism is marginalized and demonize, rejected. when people want to talk in these ways to invoke prejudice is that they often end news coded language. they say something that comes close to what they mean. if you see newt gingrich running for the said g.o.p. and the one double talking about how more people on food stamps during the barack obama presidency and you can dispute that figure or not. but the
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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